Baths

Advice for choosing a Bath

Traditionally baths were made from Cast iron with a porcelain coating – 2 men would struggle to lift one bath.  Some baths are porcelain over steel.  Most of the baths are now acrylic.  They are a lot lighter to lift and are available in several different sizes and shapes of moulding.  The main down side that some people say about them is that if you have a long hot soak in the bath you may find it doesn’t hold the heat as well.  They do not hold the heat like a steel or cast iron bath does.  One way to reduce the heat loss is to install insulation batts under the bath.

Bath mixer

A bath mixer uses the same mixer as a shower mixer and all of the shower mixer principles apply.  A lever mixer and a bath spout is the most common option chosen.  If you have low pressure, we recommend hot and cold taps because it can fill up the bath quicker.

If you have a shower over the bath, you can choose to have one mixer that feeds both the shower and the bath. A knob is depressed or pulled, to switch between the bath and the shower. This option is called a diverter and is only available for mains pressure. This system is slightly cheaper to buy and to connect to the plumbing than 2 separate mixers, as there is only one mixer.  Some people prefer to have separate ones so that the mixer is easily reachable while in the bath and while in the shower.

Bath spoutBath spout

You can have a bath spout at the foot of the bath, or on the side of the bath. A more recently available option is a waterfall bath spout (see photo).  A waterfall spout does not come out over the bath like an ordinary spout, which means people are less likely to knock themselves while in the shower, and those in the bath can lean against either end of the bath.  If several children are in the bath they would be less likely to hurt themselves than if traditional taps or a normal bath spout were used.

Shower over bath liner options 

Acrylic liners:  The most reliable option that we have found is an acrylic liner over a bath that has been designed with a lip around the top edge to seal the acrylic liner to.

Tiles:  Tiles look great and are very reliable if the waterproofing is done well.

Seratone or Hardiglaze:  Although some installers still use them for a shower over bath, we do not recommend Seratone or Hardiglaze in a shower over bath situation.  We have seen many situations where they have leaked at the bottom of the sheet where it meets the bath and in the internal corners.

Shower over Bath Screens

Glass screens (usually about 800-900mm long) on the bath are good for stopping shower water from splashing onto the floor.  Some options include a fixed glass screen, a pivot glass screen (that pivots from the wall), a glass screen with hinges in the middle – so half the glass screen is fixed to the wall and the other half can fold back against the first half.  Glass screens can get in the way of stepping into the bath, and when bathing children – this is why folding options are available.

Other options for bath screens are: screens that slide on a track, roll up plastic screens and shower curtains.  Screens on a track often don’t slide nicely after several years, roll up plastic screens can stay wet and get mouldy and can be frustrating to use, and shower curtains regularly let water onto the floor.

Fixed or pivot screen  Hinged screen

 Fixed or pivot screen                                                                Hinged screen

Other options for bath screens are: screens that slide on a track, roll up plastic screens and shower curtains.  Screens on a track often don’t slide nicely after several years, roll up plastic screens can stay wet and get mouldy and can be frustrating to use, and shower c